Universal Constants: A New Foundation of Measurement    >   Standardize - Achieve Precision

Around the World and In Your Pocket

Take a close look at a smart phone. Does it have the appearance of something that has been around the world? This almost ubiquitous device is an example of coordinated measurement and production precision like no other.

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Pull your phone out of your purse or pocket. Take a hard look. Does it have the appearance of something that has been around the world? This almost ubiquitous device is an example of coordinated measurement and production precision like no other.

Read Web Link - How iPhone Is Made - The Global Assembly Line

Then answer these questions with a friend or in a group:

  1.  Where is the production coordinated? Cupertino, California
  2. Where are the iPhone systems engineers?  Cupertino, California
  3. What is the key part of the phone?  CPU, A6 chip
  1. What does it do? It’s the ”brains” of the machine
  2. Where is it manufactured? Austin TX
  3. What is it made of? Silicon
  1. Where is the software developed that “talks to” the chip?  North Carolina
  2. Phones need “rare earth” elements.
  1. What are they?  Lanthanides, scandium, yttrium
  2. Where are these mined?  China
  1. Where is the display (LCD) made?  Japan
  2. Where is the gyroscope made for geotracking?  Europe
  3. Where is the final assembly completed?  China
  4. What is key to making this all work?  Precision